Science

Coffee and Cigarettes: Research Sheds New Light on Nicotine and Morning Brew – Neuroscience News

Summary: For smokers, the first cigarette of the day is often accompanied by a cup of coffee. Researchers say this may be more than a habit, finding chemical compounds in roasted coffee beans may help quell the effects of morning nicotine cravings.

Source: University of Florida

For some smokers, the first cigarette of the day is just not as satisfying without a cup of coffee. That could be more than just a morning habit: Chemical compounds in roasted coffee beans may help lighten the effects of morning nicotine cravings, University of Florida researchers have found.

In a cell-based study, the researchers identified two compounds in coffee that directly affect certain high-sensitivity nicotine receptors in the brain. In smokers, these brain receptors can be hypersensitive after a night of nicotine withdrawal.

The recently published findings have yet to be tested in humans but are an important step toward better understanding how coffee and cigarettes affect nicotine receptors in the brain, said Roger L. Papke, Ph.D., a pharmacology professor in the UF College of Medicine. Caffeine is coffee’s feel-good ingredient for most people but smokers may get another kind of boost.

“Many people like caffeine in the morning but there are other molecules in coffee that may explain why cigarette smokers want their coffee,” Papke said.

This shows a cup of coffeeThe researchers applied a dark-roasted coffee solution to cells that express a particular human nicotine receptor. Image is in the public domain

The researchers applied a dark-roasted coffee solution to cells that express a particular human nicotine receptor. An organic chemical compound in coffee may help restore the nicotine receptor dysfunction that leads to nicotine cravings in smokers, the researchers concluded.

The findings have led Papke to a broader hypothesis: One of the compounds in brewed coffee, known as n-MP, may help to quell morning nicotine cravings.

Papke said he was intrigued by the idea that nicotine-dependent smokers associate tobacco use with coffee in the morning and alcohol in the evening. While alcohol’s effect on nicotine receptors in the brain has been thoroughly researched, the receptors’ interaction with coffee has been studied less.

“Many people look for coffee in the morning because of the caffeine. But was the coffee doing anything else to smokers? We wanted to know if there were other things in coffee that were affecting the brain’s nicotine receptors,” Papke said.

The findings, he said, provide a good foundation for behavioral scientists who could further study nicotine withdrawal in animal models.

Abstract

Coffee and cigarettes: Modulation of high and low sensitivity α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by n-MP, a biomarker of coffee consumption

Smokers report particular appreciation for coffee with their first cigarettes of the day.

We investigated with voltage-clamp experiments, effects of aqueous extracts (coffees) of unroasted and roasted coffee beans on the activity of human brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtypes expressed in Xenopus oocytes, looking at complex brews, low molecular weight (LMW) fractions, and specific compounds present in coffee.

When co-applied with PNU-120596, a positive allosteric modulator (PAM), the coffees stimulated currents from cells expressing α7 nAChR that were larger than ACh controls.

The PAM-dependent responses to green bean coffee were three-fold greater than those to dark roasted coffee, consistent with α7 receptor activation by choline, a component of coffee that is partially degraded in the roasting process.

Coffees were tested on both high sensitivity (HS) and low sensitivity (LS) forms of α4β2 nAChR, which are associated with nicotine addiction.

To varying degrees, these receptors were both activated and inhibited by the coffees and LMW extracts. We also examined the activity of nine small molecules present in coffee. Only two compounds, 1-methylpyridinium and 1-1-dimethylpiperidium, produced during the process of roasting coffee beans, showed significant effects on nAChR.

The compounds were competitive antagonists of the HS α4β2 receptors, but were PAMs for LS α4β2 receptors. HS receptors in smokers are likely to progressively desensitize through a day of smoking but may be hypersensitive in the mornings when brain nicotine levels are low.

A smoker’s first cup of coffee may therefore balance the effects of the day’s first cigarette in the brain.

Can you have Mayim Bialik translate this for me?

Reply

  • Oh Common Sense SO True!!! I love your perspective and outlook on all this – You’ve given me the best laugh ever!!! Coffee or knitting can only replace and postpone a cigarette craving for so long. And then theres the Diet Coke addiction that I cannot blame and gaslight to a Diet Coke receptor, lol!!! Chocolate, glass of wine, just enjoy life’s pleasures in moderation and try to avoid starting addictive habits that are hard to quit and are unhealthy, is my advice. 🙂 I want them to find an easy way for people to quit smoking!

    Reply

  • Is this study supposed to be a joke? I sure hope no taxpayer money was wasted here. Caffeine and nicotine are obviously stimulants which both boost dopamine which they are craving. It’s more pleasant to have 1 cigarette and 1 cup of coffee than chug a liter of coffee or chainsmoke a couple of cigarettes to get the same net effect. That’s LITERALLY all there is to it. The “researchers” should be ashamed of themselves for wasting resources on observing things we already know. Now before they get another opportunity to waste people’s money, let me help out and provide the answer to their next useless study that they will inevitably do.

    People drink alcohol before sleeping because it is a depressant/sedative. If they have a cigarette with it, it’s for the dopamine and the calming effect of smoking, which is similar to meditation because you control your breathing and etc. We do not need studies on this.

    Reply

  • I’ve often thought that the smell of used wet coffee grounds is exactly the smell of old ash trays of cigarettes. Same, Same!

    Reply

    1. Lay your burdens on Jesus Christ even cigarettes. He took away the craving of cigarettes, crack cocaine and alcohol from me when I decided to surrender them I’ve been 26 years free. 🙏 Jesus Christ thank you. Amen.

      Reply

  • Can scientist come up with a Safe Product that gives the effects of Coffee & Nicotene without the damage they give? I’m sure Millions will take it.

    Reply

  • Where monkeys used to determine the results in your coffee nicotine via brain inplant 😡😠

    Reply

  • This is one of those cases of smart peoples dumbest theories. People who smoke aren’t like other addicts they don’t always have other addictions like coffee and alcohol. I have relatives that are that way wake up to coffee and a smoke go to bed with a smoke and liquor but in reality they were all addicted to alcohol and coffee long before ever smoking a cigarette it was just how they were raised to drink coffee when you wake up and when you’re tired and alcohol was the main ingredient in most old homeschool rememdies so they grew up drinking it specially before bedtime to help them sleep. These habits don’t all go together because of some nicotine receptors in the brain how exactly does a brain even have receptors for man-made poison like nicotine anyway? That makes the least sense out of the whole article it’s like saying concrete receptors in the brain make us think concrete is hot. If you love Pepsi you have Pepsi receptors in your brain. Most people start drinking caffeine and liquor before ever touching a cigarette or nicotine product. I’ve been a smoker all my life everything from tobacco to natural herbs it’s my culture but I can’t stand coffee or alcohol and I don’t mess with drugs or anything else that’s considered addictive. I can take opiods for months then quit cold turkey no problems smoking isn’t really a addiction for me i never crave a smoke it’s just something I grew up with and still do a habit rather than addiction in my culture praying requires smoke to send it to the creator. I think highly educated people usually bypass common sense reality and try to find the most complex sounding theories they can come up with to confuse people.

    Reply

    1. I agree. I don’t smoke and I didn’t start drinking coffee until I was in my 60s. I like coffee but I don’t need it.

      Reply

      1. Oh Bob SO True!!! I love your perspective and outlook on all this – You’ve given me the best laugh ever!!! Coffee or knitting can only replace and postpone a cigarette craving for so long. And then theres the Diet Coke addiction that I cannot blame and gaslight to a Diet Coke receptor, lol!!! Chocolate, glass of wine, just enjoy life’s pleasures in moderation and try to avoid starting addictive habits that are hard to quit and are unhealthy, is my advice. 🙂 I want them to find an easy way for people to quit smoking!

        Reply

  • Caffeine and nicotine give me protein to start my day off right..

    Reply

  • No one is mentioning morning Java with a “Joint!”

    Reply

    1. I love starting my day with a joint and a cuppa Joe. I do it daily. Wake and bake. No nicotine for me. I’m 65 and it enhances my day

      Reply

  • I am this person in the article and you can use me as a human trail regards to the article. What is worse for me today I suffer from seizures. I need Help.

    Reply

  • A good morning read with coffee in one hand, cigarette in the other. Now I understand why I understand!

    Reply

  • What would be great is if they could figure out how to use that extracts to help people stop smoking.

    Reply

    1. I would also like to be a trial patient. This would be wonderful to those of us who need to stop smoking!

      Reply

      1. I agree with the findings so far. Sometimes when I don’t have a cigarette for a while, I’ll crave coffee. I do enjoy my morning smoke with my brew. Not so much the alcohol part though. Not a big drinker. I’d love to be apart of this study if that’s ever an option.

        Reply

      2. I hate to tell ya…there is NO easy way to stop. I smoked for 50 years but I’m now on day 128 without a cigarette…or nicotine. This is by far the hardest thing I’ve ever done. You know what’s crazy though? My sister just recently passed from copd and I wanted a cigarette sooo badly. She passed on my 100th day of quitting. After watching her struggle for those last three breaths convinced me to never pick up another smoke…or vape. I’m not gonna lie and tell you it was easy, it was awful and I’ve gained 20 pounds. I’ll take the extra weight though and have increased my walking time.Good luck to ya…you CAN do it!!

        Reply

  • Source neurosciencenews.com

    Related posts

    Potential Way to Tune the Brain Into Learning Mode – Neuroscience News

    Cynthia Danforth

    Ten Minutes of Aerobic Exercise With Exposure Therapy Found to Reduce PTSD Symptoms – Neuroscience News

    Cynthia Danforth

    Does Entitlement Make You More Likely to Cheat? – Neuroscience News

    Cynthia Danforth

    Leave a Comment